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Global survey for English language teachers: how far does published research matter to you, and why (or why not)?

  • 28 Mar 2020
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Global survey for English language teachers: how far does published research matter to you, and why (or why not)?

Dear colleague,

Apologies for contacting you ‘out of the blue’, and at a time when most of us are experiencing such difficult circumstances with regard to the Covid-19 virus. I hope this message is not too much of an intrusion (many apologies if so), and, indeed, perhaps it might provide you with something different to think about at this time...


As you may remember, a few years ago, you participated in a research project which I coordinated and was supported by the British Council, completing an online questionnaire which focused on ‘the use of the learners’ own language in the English language classroom’. That project resulted in a report for teachers which brought all the findings together, and I hope you received a copy/link to it at the time via email. If not, the publication is freely available online at:  https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/sites/teacheng/files/C448%20Own%20Language%20use%20in%20ELT_A4_FINAL_WEB%20ONLY_0.pdf   . All these years later, thank you once again for your great help with that research.


These few years later, I am now engaged in a further research project, again supported by the British Council, and I was wondering, based on your previous participation, whether you might again be able to spare a short amount of time (15-20 minutes) to complete an online survey. I would be really grateful if so (but fully appreciate that you may not be able to). The details are as follows:


Global survey for English language teachers: how far does published research matter to you, and why (or why not)?


To what extent do you read research about English language teaching and learning? What kind of publications do you read, how often do you read them, and to what extent does this influence what you do in the classroom?

Alternatively, perhaps you don't read research or about research findings? If not, why not, and what, if anything, would make published research more accessible to you?


We are interested in the opinions and activities of ALL English language teachers, whether you read published research or not, whether you are particularly interested in research findings or not, and wherever in the world you teach English.


This is a great chance to make your voice heard. The survey takes around 15-20 minutes to complete, and all answers are anonymous. Findings will again be published in a freely available report later in the year


The survey can be found online at:  https://northumbria.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/reading-research-english-language-teachers-practices-priorities


Of course, just get back to me with any comments or queries. And with apologies for cross-posting if you have already seen notifications about the survey online, or have even already completed it (and if you have started but not yet finished the survey, it is possible to return to the questionnaire online to complete it).


With very best wishes at this difficult time, and thank you very much for reading this far!


Graham (Hall)


Associate Professor

Department of Humanities

Faculty of Arts, Design and Social Sciences

Northumbria University

Newcastle upon Tyne

NE1 8ST

UK

http://www.northumbria.ac.uk/sd/academic/sass/about/humanities/linguistics/linguisticsstaff/g_hall/

 

Exploring English Language Teaching: Language in Action (2nd edition, 2017)

Winner of the 2012 BAAL Book Prize

https://www.routledge.com/Exploring-English-Language-Teaching-Language-in-Action/Hall/p/book/9781138722811

 

Routledge Handbook of English Language Teaching (ed.)

https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415747394

 

Editor 2013-17, ELT Journal


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